Thursday, September 18, 2014

Goofy Post 2 or Emotional Content




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QU9SsTwY5nU

Above is the link to an old Bruce Lee film. I am old enough to have actually seen it in the theater.


In my previous post, I was writing ( rambling on ) about emotion and fencing. That post was so goofy, I am thinking of deleting it. By chance this morning, I saw part of "Enter the Dragon".

Emotional Content

Often, I tell my kids to, "lunge like you mean it or "put more/less energy into that action".

There is some kind of interesting thing that happens with emotion on strip. It is not as important as footwork ; decent technique or tactics. Yet it must have some importance. Or maybe not. I often latch on to these little things and over think them,

It will make an interesting thing for me to look at when I am watching other people fence tonight.

1 comment:

Tom Bryan said...

Emotional Content

Often, I tell my kids to, "lunge like you mean it or "put more/less energy into that action".

There is some kind of interesting thing that happens with emotion on strip. It is not as important as footwork ; decent technique or tactics. Yet it must have some importance. Or maybe not. I often latch on to these little things and over think them,


I definitely think that energy is an important factor to consider. There's definitely a tendency among some students to go through the motions in practice. By being present and practicing like you actually fence, practice becomes much more useful. With a room full of beginners, you may have to remind them to fence with energy. With a mixed class, your senior members are hopefully modeling this behavior for the new students.

But even in competition, it can be an issue. I was just talking to an epeeist this weekend. He had a decent strategy for the bout, but possibly in an effort to stay relaxed and loose, he ended up fencing with very little energy at the end. I think that he had a better chance of winning if he had fenced the same plan with more energy, and we talked about it at some length.

It's important to be loose and not tense, but it's also important to be energetic. A lunge where the fencer uses gravity to fall into a lunge position is a lunge with no energy. A lunge that starts in a good on guard and where the back leg pushes with good acceleration and where the hand and front leg reach out to land in a firm and balanced lunge is a lunge with good energy.

I think of "energy" separately from "emotion." It's possible to be angry and fence with good energy. It's possible to be happy and fence with good energy. As you said in your other post, each fencer has to experiment and find the emotional state that gives him the best results. But no matter the emotional state, the fencer almost always wants to perform his action "with energy."